viernes, 11 de mayo de 2018

The Lost City, Roots of Tarascan Sovereigns: Exhibition at the National Museum of Anthropology and History


The Lost City, Roots of Tarascan Sovereigns exhibition opened on April 27 in the Media Luna of the National Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City, and will remain there until July 29, 2018.
The Lost City, Roots of the Tarascan Sovereigns : Exhibition at the National Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City

This is a great opportunity for people interested in Prehispanic culture of Mexico to know more about this pre-Columbian empire that was located in the Center of western Mexico.
The Lost City, Roots of the Tarascan Sovereigns : Exhibition at the National Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City

At Hotel Mansion Iturbe in Patzcuaro, we invite you to discover a time of little-known “Middle Post-Classic history of Michoacán, which was prior to the Tarascan Empire.  After visiting the exhibition, you will appreciate even more your next visit to our region.
View of the Lake Region from theArchaeological Zone in Tzintzuntza
View of the Lake Region from theArchaeological Zone in Tzintzuntzan

"The “Lost City” is the name given by the current residents of the basin of Zacapu Michoacan to Malpaís Prieto (badlands of Prieto), a pre-Hispanic settlement founded around 1250 A.D., on a volcanic area. It is bleak and stony place, and was one of the most densely populated cities in the western part of Mexico."
The Chichimeca indigenous group were the settlers of Malpais. In the 13th century, they migrated to the basin of the Lake of Pátzcuaro where, together with the elite of the local populations, formed a new aristocracy led by a ruling dynasty. They gradually conquered territories that would become the powerful Tarascan Empire.
The Archaeological Site of Tzintzunzan
The Archaeological Site of Tzintzunzan

Very close of Pátzcuaro, you can visit the archaeological sites of Tzintzuntzan, which was the capital of the Tarascan Empire, and the Ceremonial Center of Ihuatzio which was also used as an astronomical observatory.
The Archaeological Site of Ihuatzio
The Archaeological Site of Ihuatzio

The exhibition also shows the geological environment of the region of the basin of Zacapu (about 65 kilometers/40 miles from Pátzcuaro) formed as a result of the constant tectonic activity of more than 3 million years.  It was built on a lava spill, devoid of soil and vegetation. Surrounding forests were of pine and oak. The residents obtained water from the springs of the low-lying areas.
The Sacred Precinct at the Site of Malpais Prieto, in the Basin of Zacapu
The Sacred Precinct at the Site of Malpais Prieto, in the Basin of Zacapu


"This exhibition presents the moment that precedes the formation of the Tarascan State, based on on-site Prieto Malpais archaeological investigations sponsored by the Centro de Estudios Mexicanos and Centroamericanos (CEMCA), and unpublished collections of the National Museum of Anthropology."
The Lost City, Roots of the Tarascan Sovereigns : Exhibition at the National Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City
The Lost City, Roots of the Tarascan Sovereigns : Exhibition at the National Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City

Pieces on exhibit include beautifully made objects, most of which were used by people in the upper echelons of society. Among these objects are earrings,  necklaces, bracelets, bells, and smoking pipes.
The Lost City, Roots of the Tarascan Sovereigns : Exhibition at the National Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City
The Lost City, Roots of the Tarascan Sovereigns : Exhibition at the National Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City

Common artifacts such as polychrome pottery, and tools made of copper, and tin and silver alloys.
Pre-hispanic polychrome ceramic utensils
Pre-hispanic polychrome ceramic utensils

Metal utensils in the exhibition: The lost City, Roots of the TarascanSovereigns in Mexico City
Metal utensils in the exhibition: The lost City, Roots of the TarascanSovereigns in Mexico City

You will also see how they buried the remains of these people.  They were cremated, and the ashes were placed in an urn which was buried the foot of the main temples.
Vassel used as funeral urn
Vassel used as funeral urn

The role of animals are also presented in this exhibition. Deer were considered an powerful element of the Tarascans and was highly valued in the ritual hunts. The skin was used to cloak the image of the most important God, Curicaueri. Deer was also consumed as food, and the remains were used as part of offerings.
Coyotes and birds of prey were also of importance.
Sculpture of Coyote and remains of other animals
Sculpture of Coyote and remains of other animals

If you are in Mexico City, give yourself time to visit this interesting exhibition about one of the great empires of the west of Mesoamerica.
This fine museum contains the most important collection of archaeological pieces from Mexico.
Exhibition:The lost City, Roots of the Tarascan Sovereigns at the National Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City
Exhibition:The lost City, Roots of the Tarascan Sovereigns at the National Museum of Anthropology and History in Mexico City

Come to Michoacán and get to know the different archaeological sites!

*Text and picture property of Hotel Mansion Iturbe.


We invite you to check more post in our blog, you will find information about Pátzcuaro and its surroundings, that we hope will be useful for your next trip to our colonial town in Mexico.

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Hotel Mansion Iturbe
Portal Morelos 59
Plaza Vasco de Quiroga
61600 Patzcuaro, Michoacan
México

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Tels: +52 (434) 342 0368 / 342 3628

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